INSPIRATIONAL PEOPLE

…. You May Think Your Life Is Tough But Think Again ….

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JESUS CHRIST, MY LORD AND SAVIOR

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6 Things Christ Accomplished by His Death

Here’s a very brief summary of the six core things Christ accomplished in his death.

  1. Expiation

Expiation means the removal of our sin and guilt. Christ’s death removes — expiates — our sin and guilt. The guilt of our sin was taken away from us and placed on Christ, who discharged it by his death.  Thus, in John 1:29, John the Baptist calls Jesus “the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world.” Jesus takes away, that is, expiates, our sins. Likewise, Isaiah 53:6 says, “The Lord has caused the iniquity of us all to fall on him,” and Hebrews 9:26 says “He has been manifested to put away sin by the sacrifice of Himself.”

  1. Propitiation

Whereas expiation refers to the removal of our sins, propitiation refers to the removal of God’s wrath. By dying in our place for our sins, Christ removed the wrath of God that we justly deserved. In fact, it goes even further: propitiation is not simply a sacrifice that removes wrath, but a sacrifice that removes wrath and turns it into favor. (Note: a propitiation does not turn wrath into love — God already loved us fully, which is the reason he sent Christ to die; it turns his wrath into favor so that his love may realize its purpose of doing good to us every day, in all things, forever, without sacrificing his justice and holiness.)

Several passages speak of Christ’s death as a propitiation for our sins. Romans 3:25-26 says that God “displayed [Christ] publicly as propitiation in his blood through faith. This was to demonstrate his righteousness, because in the forbearance of God he passed over the sins previously committed; for the demonstration of his righteousness at the present time, that he might be just and the justifier of him who has faith in Jesus.”  Likewise, Hebrews 2:17 says that Christ made “propitiation for the sins of the people” and 1 John 4:10 says “in this is love, not that we loved God, but that he loved us and sent his Son to be the propitiation for our sins.”

  1. Reconciliation

Whereas expiation refers to the removal of our sins, and propitiation refers to the removal of God’s wrath, reconciliation refers to the removal of our alienation from God.  Because of our sins, we were alienated — separated — from God. Christ’s death removed this alienation and thus reconciled us to God. We see this, for example, in Romans 5:10-11: “For if while we were enemies, we were reconciled to God through the death of his Son, much more, having been reconciled, shall we be saved by his life.”

  1. Redemption

Our sins had put us in captivity from which we need to be delivered. The price that is paid to deliver someone from captivity is called a “ransom.” To say that Christ’s death accomplished redemption for us means that it accomplished deliverance from our captivity through the payment of a price.

There are three things we had to be released from: the curse of the law, the guilt of sin, and the power of sin. Christ redeemed us from each of these.

  • Christ redeemed us from the curse of the law: “Christ redeemed us from the curse of the law, having become a curse for us” (Galatians 3:13-14).
  • Christ redeemed us from the guilt of our sin. We are “justified as a gift by his grace, through the redemption which is in Christ Jesus” (Romans 3:24).
  • Christ redeemed us from the power of sin: “knowing that you were not redeemed with perishable things like silver or gold from your futile way of life inherited from your fathers, but with precious blood, as of a lamb unblemished and spotless, the blood of Christ” (1 Peter 1:18-19).

Note that we are not simply redeemed from the guilt of sin; to be redeemed from the power of sin means that our slavery to sin is broken. We are now free to live to righteousness. Our redemption from the power of sin is thus the basis of our ability to live holy lives: “You have been bought with a price; therefore glorify God in your bodies” (1 Corinthians 6:20).

  1. Defeat of the Powers of Darkness

Christ’s death was a defeat of the power of Satan. “He disarmed the rulers and authorities and put them to open shame, by triumphing over them in him” (Colossians 3:15). Satan’s only weapon that can ultimately hurt people is unforgiven sin. Christ took this weapon away from him for all who would believe, defeating him and all the powers of darkness in his death by, as the verse right before this says, “having forgiven us all our trespasses, by canceling the record of debt that stood against us with its legal demands. This he set aside, nailing it to the cross” (Colossians 2:13-14).

  1. And he Did All of This By Dying As Our Substitute

The reality of substitution is at the heart of the atonement. Christ accomplished all of the above benefits for us by dying in our place — that is, by dying instead of us. We deserved to die, and he took our sin upon him and paid the penalty himself.   This is what it means that Christ died for us (Romans 5:8) and gave himself for us (Galatians 2:20). As Isaiah says, “he was pierced through for our transgressions, he was crushed for our iniquities . . . the Lord has caused the iniquity of us all to fall on him” (Isaiah 53:5-6). You see the reality of substitution underlying all of the benefits discussed above, as the means by which Christ accomplished them. For example, substitution is the means by which we were ransomed: “The Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give his life a ransom for many” (Matthew 20:28). Christ’s death was a ransom for us — that is, instead of us. Likewise, Paul writes that “Christ redeemed us from the curse of the law by becoming a curse for us” (Galatians 3:13).

Substitution is the means by which we were reconciled: “For Christ also died for sins once for all, the just for the unjust, in order that he might bring us to God” (1 Peter 3:18). It is the means of expiation: “He made him who knew no sin to be sin on our behalf that we might become the righteousness of God in him” (2 Corinthians 5:21) and “He himself bore our sins in his body on the cross, that we might die to sin and live to righteousness” (1 Peter 2:24). And by dying in our place, taking the penalty for our sins upon himself, Christ’s death is also the means of propitiation.

http://www.whatsbestnext.com/2011/04/6-things-christ-accomplished-by-his-death/

 

ERYTHROMELALGIA (EM) WARRIORS 

EM Help

The pain is often times unbearable, and the suicide rate is high.

Imagine yourself living during the medieval times, and although you’re an innocent person, you’re about to be secured to a wooden post and burned alive while a crowd of people watch.  That pretty much describes the impending doom when diagnosed with EM. The only differences are EM sufferers’ burn alive on a daily basis — and we’re not tied to a stake.

EM causes severe burning pain, noticeable redness (erythema) of the skin, swelling, and increased skin temperature, particularly of the feet. However, the hands, face, ears, and limbs can also be affected.  It can affect men, women, and children of all ages and nationalities.  1 : 100,000 (subject to change).

My EM friends are some of the most amazing people I have ever known. When an EM warrior is down we all chime in to lift their spirits, letting them know we’re all in this together. Our warriors reside all over the world — USA wide, Canada, Norway, England, Scotland, Argentina, New Zealand, Italy, Sweden and France, just to name a few.

We’ll never give up.  WE NEED A CURE.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/melissa-curley-bogner/burning-for-hope_b_9618652.html

 

RACHELLE FREIDMAN, “THE PARALYZED BRIDE”

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There are very few moments that can happen in one’s life that can change everything forever. In a split second your relationships change, your job, your finances, your home, your clothes, your independence. One moment gone terribly wrong and it’s all different. On May 23, 2010, Rachelle Friedman was playfully pushed into a pool by her best friend at her bachelorette party just weeks before her wedding. She hit the bottom of the pool head first, breaking her neck and causing a severe spinal cord injury. Rachelle had to face a difficult fact. She was now paralyzed from the chest down and would be a quadriplegic for the rest of her life.

Rachelle could have easily given up on life, constantly asked why her and wondered what if? But she made the decision to move forward in her life with positivity and determination. 13 weeks after her injury she began playing adapted sports such as wheelchair rugby, hand cycling and even surfing. Within a year she had appeared on The Today Show, Headline News, MSNBC, Inside Edition and numerous news outlets both nationally and internationally to share her story of love, commitment, loyalty, and perseverance. She has been featured in Cosmopolitan magazine, In Touch magazine and as a guest on Vh1′s Couples Therapy.

Though she has remained positive, Rachelle is an advocate for a cure. She hopes to inspire you while conveying the hard realities of having a spinal cord injury. She plans on being positive as her situation is her current reality, but remains hopeful that research is headed for a cure.

Rachelle has made it her mission to spread her story in hope of inspiring others to make the most of each day they are given. “Why waste your time harping on insignificant things?” Rachelle asks. “Believe in defining your life by the positive moments and not the negative.”

Rachelle Friedman Chapman and Chris Chapman have made sure their new baby Kaylee Rae is surrounded by love. Since welcoming her via surrogate on April 26, 2015 the new parents have gotten used to life with a newborn.

http://rachellefriedman.com/my-story/

 

MICHAEL J. FOX

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Michael J. Fox’s Crusade for a Parkinson’s Cure

How the actor’s Parkinson’s diagnosis changed his life — for the better, he says.

Michael J. Fox has always been a poster boy. With his youthful good looks and intelligent charm, he rose to fame playing a sassy Republican teenage son of ex-hippie parents in the TV sitcom Family Ties. In the blockbuster Back to the Future film trilogy, he was a time traveler with perfect comedic timing. And in a later sitcom, Spin City, he made us wish all politicians were as personable as his Deputy Mayor Mike Flaherty.

In 1998, Fox became a poster boy for another reason: He went public with the news he had Parkinson’s disease diagnosed 7 years earlier when he was 30. Parkinson’s is marked by:

  • Trembling in the hands, arms, legs, jaw, and face
  • Stiffness of the body
  • Slow movements
  • Impaired balance and coordination.

The disease had become unmanageable for the actor, who until then was able to minimize his symptoms thanks to medication, surgery, and good timing. Eventually, the effort became too much.

“I needed every bit of those 7 years to say, ‘I want to be out there,'” Fox says. “But at a certain point I woke up and said, ‘What’s the risk? That people will judge you? People are already judging you about whether you wear red shoes or blue shoes. So I talk funny or shake — why should I restrict myself?'”

“You have to take your time and do what you need to do,” he says. “But when you arrive at a place where you are no longer judging it, where there’s no good or bad or right or wrong and it just is what it is, you accept it.”

Much to his amazement, so did everyone else. While Fox feared becoming a sob story for the tabloids, he was met with huge support. Overnight, the actor beloved for his ability to make people laugh came to represent the face of an incurable illness that gets worse over time.

http://www.webmd.com/parkinsons-disease/features/michael-j-fox-crusade-parkinsons

 

CHRISTOPHER REEVE

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Christopher Reeve was born September 25, 1952 in New York City. He had various stage and television roles before becoming the star of Superman and its sequels. In 1995 he became paralyzed from the neck down following a horse-riding accident. He founded the Christopher Reeve Paralysis Foundation in 1998 to promote research on spinal cord injuries. He died of cardiac arrest in 2004.

 

MARIUS DASIANU

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A 12-year-old burn victim from Romania has found hope, and a new family, in the United States.  Marius Dasianu is a remarkable youngster who has been undergoing treatment at the Shriners Hospital for Children in Los Angeles.

On a visit to the hospital’s recreation room, Marius tests his gaming skills with two new friends.  He is as energetic and active as any other youngster.

But his story is dramatic.  Marius was born in Romania and at the age of 9, lost both of his parents in a house fire.  He suffered serious burns over 75 percent of his body.  He was visited in his Romanian hospital by two American volunteers, Jessica Free and Ashley Ludlow.  The young women got their families involved and they enlisted the help of this American hospital, which provides treatment for children with orthopedic conditions and disfigurements.

Marius has had his big toes removed and grafted onto his hands to replace his fingers. Plastic surgeon Katherine Au says Marius has maintained a positive outlook, despite his injuries. “He lost all of his fingers, essentially, burned his face, lost his entire nose, and if you talk to him now, he has the most girlfriends, he was class valedictorian, he does everything.  Nothing stops him,” she said.

Marius faces many more surgeries.  His American foster mother, Lynne Woodward, says he has endured the ordeal without complaint.

“He’s the most amazing kid you’ll ever meet.  He inspires everybody wherever he goes.  He makes friends so easily.  He makes people feel comfortable.  He’s got a really amazing set of social skills,” Woodward said. “He really does.”

Marius’ older brother, Lonut, who had been living in Italy, brought Marius to America as his legal guardian. Lonut would later marry the Woodward’s daughter, Ashley, one of the young women who had found Marius in the hospital.  They are now the parents of a baby boy.

Marius’ foster father, Paul Woodward, anticipates a bright future for the boy.  “It’s going to be nice to see what the future holds, and see him grow to be a man and get married and have children of his own, and hopefully give us many grandchildren and maybe some great grandchildren if we’re around long enough,” he said.

First, though, there will be a long road to full recovery.  But Marius’ doctor and foster family say his positive attitude and buoyant spirit will help them all get through it.

http://www.voanews.com/content/young-romanian-burn-victim-gets-help-in-california-117517453/170534.html

 

NOAH GALLOWAY

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Noah Galloway (born in 1982 in Birmingham, Alabama) is an American Sergeant, personal trainer and motivational speaker. He joined the United States Army in 2001, serving in the 1st Battalion of the 502nd Infantry, 101st Airborne Division, during Operation Iraqi Freedom. In 2005, during his second tour of duty, Noah lost his left arm and left leg in an IED attack. He faced a rough recovery, and the period after his injury was wrought with alcohol abuse and smoking. He has since turned his life around and now works as a popular public speaker. Galloway has also appeared on the cover of Men’s Health magazine. He competed on season 20 of Dancing with the Stars.

http://hollywoodlife.com/celeb/noah-galloway/

 

LAUREN HILL

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Lauren Hill, the college basketball player whose cancer battle captured the country’s attention and raised millions of dollars to fight the disease, died at the age of 19.

Hill was diagnosed with terminal cancer during her senior year of high school. In the fall doctors told her that she had just months to live — the inoperable tumor on her brain growing with each passing day — but she beat those odds, playing in the season-opener for Mount St. Joseph’s and earning a spot on the Heartland Collegiate Athletic Conference’s first team.

But it wasn’t her play that earned her accolades, it was her fight. Hill dedicated herself to raising money to help others fight the disease that was taking her life — Diffused Intrinsic Pontine Giloma.

“Through Lauren’s fund-raising and advocacy efforts she not only became a spotlight on the lack of funding for cancer research, but she most certainly has become a beacon guiding researchers for years to come,” Brook Desserich, co-founder of The Cure Starts Now, Hill’s foundation, said on the group’s Facebook page.

A year and a half ago, Hill was just another high school student getting ready for college and decided to play basketball at Mount St. Joseph. Soccer was her favorite sport, but basketball became her selling point.

A few weeks later, she started experiencing dizziness while playing for her high school team in nearby Lawrenceburg, Indiana. Tests found the tumor. Treatment didn’t work. She knew she had less than two years left.

“She’s made an impact on the world, more so than me — more than I ever will do,” Dan Benjamin, her coach, told The Associated Press. “I’ve gotten so many emails and phone calls from all over the world. People are contacting me because they want to share her story.”

http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/college/inspirational-college-basketball-player-lauren-hill-dies-article-1.2180367

 

CHRIS TOMLINSON

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Chris Tomlinson, a 28-year-old homeless burn victim, inspired people by his experience.  When he was nearly 2 years old, Tomlinson slipped out from a swing in his Florida backyard and ventured to the shed when his mother wasn’t looking. He dumped gasoline on himself and after the pilot light on the heater ignited, it set the little boy on fire. His mother rescued him from the shed and doctors gave him a 1 percent chance of surviving the night.

The candid survivor shared the horrific details of how he was burned on more than 98 percent of his body when he was a toddler and how he’s continued to fight the bevy of obstacles he’s faced since, as he believes he looks like a monster now.

 

KAITLYN DOBROW

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It’s been so long since Kaitlyn Dobrow went anywhere in her wheelchair that the battery on her family’s ramp-equipped van died recently from lack of use.

Three years after bacterial meningitis led to the amputation of all four of her limbs, Dobrow has fully adjusted to the prosthetic legs she wears from morning to night. She’s still mastering her prosthetic arms, after receiving the left one only a month ago.

“With the legs, I can do anything now,” she said. “I can go into my friends’ houses instead of saying, ‘Do you have a ramp? I’m in a wheelchair.’ It’s just so much easier. My legs get a little achy but it’s nothing that hinders me. Before I’d wear them for an hour and they’d start hurting.”

With her arms, Dobrow has swept the floor, folded laundry, doodled and fed herself. She’s now working on conquering the fears that stand between her and greater self-sufficiency, including climbing the stairs in her two-story Huntington Beach house and attending cosmetology school.

“God told me 2016 is going to be my year,” she said. “I’m excited but nervous to actually get my life started. I’ve been so coddled for years and so taken care of. Now I have to start doing it on my own.”

Her mother, Kathi Dobrow, helps her dress and bathe but hopes eventually she can get waterproof limbs.

“What I am anxious for is for Katie to start working on getting independent from me,” Kathi Dobrow said. “I’m 60 and I want to have the confidence she’ll be OK when I get too old to take care of her. She needs to figure out how she will support herself and what she wants to do school- and career-wise.”

In February 2013, Dobrow nearly died after contracting bacterial meningitis. The infection caused her blood to clot, stopping it from reaching more than half of her skin and soft tissues. The resulting damage was the equivalent of third-degree burns.

She spent six months in the intensive care unit at UCI Medical Center; underwent more than 20 surgeries, including skin grafts; and then stayed two months in a rehabilitation hospital.

Candy Cooper, a UCI nurse who cared for Kaitlyn Dobrow, said she was overjoyed when she walked into the burn unit to visit, calling her recovery “nothing short of a miracle.”

“It’s not just her physical progress but her mental progress,” Cooper said. “Things like this change you. You get a different introspective on your life than you normally would have. It forces you to look deep in your soul, at what people mean to you, and how strong you really are.”

Inner peace

Kaitlyn Dobrow said her illness transformed her inner self as much as her outer self. She used to believe she would die young. She partied and put off planning for her future. Her own insecurities made her defensive and short-tempered with others, she said.

She said she experienced God’s love for her in the hospital and dedicated her life to Christ. She spends much of her free time now at church and Bible study.

She felt terrified in the hospital as she lost skin and limbs but said she fully experienced peace, leaving her compelled to share with others Jesus’ words from John 14:27: “Peace I leave with you; my peace I give you. I do not give to you as the world gives. Do not let your hearts be troubled and do not be afraid.”

“I don’t feel that sense of doom anymore,” she said. “I want to live.”

Kaitlyn Dobrow said her older brother told her how much she’s changed during a road trip to Las Vegas.

“He was like telling me, ‘Before, you were so mean and there was nothing wrong with you. You had your arms and you were mean,’” she recalled. “‘Now you’re just a torso and you’re so nice.’”

Adapting to her limbs

Her greatest frustration is mastering her arms, which weigh about 10 pounds each and must be strapped across her chest and back.

“The arms irritate me the most,” she said. “It’s more mental. I remember my old occupational therapist said, ‘If you get frustrated, it just gets harder. Your muscles tense. You just have to take a break.’”

She’s able to write in big letters using her right prosthetic.

“It’s kind of adorable. It’s not as bad as a kindergartner. You can read it,” she said. “My main thing before was doodling. I got the desire to pick up a pencil and scribble a heart. I missed that so much.”

As for her prosthetic legs, Kaitlyn Dobrow has embraced how sleek and stylish she looks and is eager to get running legs so she can push herself more.

“You feel like you could fall at any moment,” she said of wearing prosthetics. “You don’t have any ankles or even toes to help hold you up. You kind of feel like a daredevil. In a way, it’s fun.”

The pink blotchy scars on her face from the clotting and lack of blood flow to her tissues have become less noticeable.

“God said that shows you’re a warrior, don’t try to hide them. I’m getting kind of upset that they’re fading. I think they look pretty cool.”

http://www.ocregister.com/articles/dobrow-703454-kaitlyn-legs.html

https://www.facebook.com/kaitlyndobrow

 

TURIA PITT

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Australian ex-model Turia Pitt suffered burns to 65% of her body, lost her fingers and thumb on her right hand and spent 5 months in the hospital after she was trapped by a grassfire.  Her husband quit his job to care for her recovery.  In an interview for CNN, they asked him: “Did you at any moment think about leaving her and hiring someone to take care of her and moving on with your life?”  His reply touched the world, “I married her soul, her character, and she’s the only woman that will continue to fulfill my dreams.”

 

LAUREN KAVANAUGH

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The Girl in the Closet: Lauren Kavanaugh Was Held Prisoner for 6 Years, Until Her Rescue in 2001

This is one of the most horrific cases of abuse that we have ever heard in our entire lives. We can’t even begin to comprehend how anyone could do something like this to another human being, let alone an innocent child.

When Lauren Kavanaugh was taken away from her loving, adoptive parents, she was immediately returned to her biological mother and father, Barbara and Kenny Atkinson.

From that moment on, her life became a dark, living hell. For the next six years, she would be neglected, tortured, starved, beaten and raped.

The evil couple forced her to live in a tiny, filthy 4ft by 9ft wardrobe closet from the ages of three until she was eight-years-old.

“From then on, it became my new home,” she said. “The carpet was drenched in urine, and I lay under a thin, wet blanket.”

Surprisingly, her siblings were never abused.

“Sometimes I could hear them laughing and playing outside,” she explained. “I was weak from hunger and was tied down so I couldn’t fight back.”

Police were finally alerted about her conditions when Lauren’s father tried showing her off to a horror-struck neighbor.

By the time she was pulled from the closet by authorities, her ribs stuck out and she only weighed 25 pounds, the same as an average two-year-old.

Lauren went on to be re-adopted by the Kavanaugh family. She now lives in Athens, Texas, and hopes she can one day help abuse victims like herself.

“My dream now is to qualify as a counselor,” she said. “I really want to help victims like me to overcome their abuse and be strong. I’ve been in their shoes and come out the other side.”

Her mother later confessed that she was trying to forget that her daughter even existed. She often referred to Lauren as “it” or “the girl” but never by name.

“It was the problem. It was what was causing everything,” she was quoted saying in The Dallas Morning News. “Out of sight, out of mind. I shut it away and don’t think of it. … I couldn’t stop her being in the closet.”

In 2002, her birth parents were convicted of felony injury to a child and sentenced to life in prison. They will not be eligible for parole until 2031.

It may be difficult to get through stories like this, but we’re happy to know that her parents were brought to justice for their atrocities.

http://firsttoknow.com/the-girl-in-the-closet-lauren-kavanaugh-was-held-prisoner-for-6-years-until-her-rescue-in-2001/

 

RANDY PAUSCH, “THE LAST LECTURE”

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Randolph Frederick “Randy” Pausch (October 23, 1960 – July 25, 2008) was an American professor of computer science, human-computer interaction, and design at Carnegie Mellon University. Pausch learned that he had pancreatic cancer in September 2006, and in August 2007 he was given a terminal diagnosis: “3 to 6 months of good health left”. He gave an upbeat lecture titled “The Last Lecture: Really Achieving Your Childhood Dreams” on September 18, 2007, at Carnegie Mellon, which became a popular YouTube video and led to other media appearances. He then co-authored a book called The Last Lecture on the same theme, which became a New York Times best-seller. Pausch died of complications from pancreatic cancer on July 25, 2008.

 

SAFYRE TERRY

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Schenectady, New York, Safyre, her father, 32-year-old David Terry, and her three younger siblings, three-year-old Layah, two-year-old Michael and 11-month-old Donavon, were the victims of an arson attack.  Five-year-old Safyre was the only survivor and suffered severe burns to over 75 percent of her body.  Firefighters found her next to her father who used his body in an effort to shield her from the flames.  Since then, Safyre has undergone more than 50 operations, including surgeries to remove her right hand and in March this year, her left foot. Now eight, she only had one wish this Christmas – to have enough cards to fill her tree. So far, she’s received 1.7 million letters and 25,000 packages.

 

JAYCEE LEE DUGARD

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The kidnapping of Jaycee Lee Dugard occurred on June 10, 1991, in South Lake Tahoe, California. Dugard was 11 years old at the time and was abducted from a street while she was walking from home to a school bus stop. Searches began immediately after Dugard’s disappearance, but no reliable leads were generated. Dugard later remained missing up until 2009, when a convicted sex offender, Phillip Garrido, visited the campus of UC Berkley accompanied by two girls on August 24 and 25 that same year. Their unusual behavior sparked an investigation that led Garrido’s parole officer to order him to bring the girls to a parole office on August 26, accompanied by a young woman who was successfully identified as Dugard herself. She had been imprisoned, sexually abused, tortured and gave birth to two of his daughters.

Phillip Garrido, 58, and his wife Nancy, 54, of Antioch, California, were arrested by police for kidnapping and other charges. On April 28, 2011, they pleaded guilty to Dugard’s kidnapping and sexual assault. Law enforcement officers believe Dugard was kept in a concealed area behind the Garridos’ house in Antioch for almost 18 years. During this time, Dugard bore two daughters who were ages 11 and 15 at the time of her reappearance. On June 2, 2011, Phillip Garrido was sentenced to 431 years imprisonment; his wife, Nancy, also received 36 years to life.

 

ELIZABETH SMART

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On June 2, 2002, when she was 14 years old, Smart and her family attended an end-of-year awards ceremony at her school, where she won several awards for academics and physical fitness. Early the next morning, about an hour after midnight, Smart was awakened in the bedroom she shared with her younger sister Mary Katherine by the sound of footsteps and the feeling of cold metal against her cheek. A man whispered, “I have a knife to your neck. Don’t make a sound. Get out of bed and come with me, or I will kill you and your family.” The kidnapper, a man by the name of Brian Mitchell, led Smart out of the house and marched her for hours through the forest to a camp where his wife, Wanda Barzee, was waiting.

Mitchell fancied himself a prophet named Immanuel, and after performing a bizarre wedding ceremony—he was also a polygamist—he declared Smart to be his wife and raped her. “I tried to fight him off me,” she later testified. “A 14-year-old girl against a grown man doesn’t even out so much.” Mitchell and Barzee held Smart captive for the next nine months as they moved between California and Utah. Mitchell raped Smart daily—sometimes multiple times per day—and frequently kept her tethered to a tree. He forced her to consume vast quantities of alcohol, marijuana and other drugs and often did not feed her for days—bringing Smart to the brink of starvation. All the while, Mitchell attempted to indoctrinate Smart in his bizarre religious beliefs and convince her that he was a prophet.

The night of Smart’s kidnapping, her younger sister Mary Katherine had pretended to be asleep in the other bed while silently attempting to observe her sister’s kidnapper in the dark. “I stayed in bed,” she recalled. “I was scared. I couldn’t do anything. I was just shocked, petrified. I didn’t know what to do, knowing someone had come into my bedroom and taken my sister.” After several months, it suddenly occurred to Mary Katherine that the kidnapper resembled a man who had once worked on their home as a handyman and who had called himself Immanuel. Police discovered that Immanuel was a man named Brian David Mitchell, and in February 2003 America’s Most Wanted aired his photograph. Finally, on March 12, 2003, a passerby recognized Mitchell walking with Smart—who was veiled and wearing a wig and sunglasses. Authorities arrested Mitchell and his wife and returned Smart to her family that evening.

 

 MOTHER TERESA

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Mother Teresa (26 August 1910 – 5 September 1997) also known as Blessed Teresa of Calcutta, MC, was an Albanian Roman Catholic religious sister and missionary. She was born in Skopje (modern Macedonia), then part of the Kosovo Vilayet in the Ottoman Empire. After having lived in Macedonia for some eighteen years, she moved to Ireland and then to India, where she lived for most of her life.

Mother Teresa founded the Missionaries of Charity, a Roman Catholic religious congregation, which in 2012 consisted of over 4,500 sisters and was active in 133 countries. They run hospices and homes for people with HIV/AIDS, leprosy and tuberculosis; soup kitchens; dispensaries and mobile clinics; children’s and family counseling programs; orphanages; and schools. Members must adhere to the vows of chastity, poverty, and obedience, as well as a fourth vow, to give “wholehearted free service to the poorest of the poor”.

Mother Teresa was the recipient of numerous honors, including the 1979 Nobel Peace Prize. In 2003, she was beautified as “Blessed Teresa of Calcutta”. A second miracle was credited to her intercession by Pope Francis, in December 2015, paving the way for her to be recognized as a saint by the Roman Catholic Church.

A controversial figure both during her life and after her death, Mother Teresa was widely admired by many for her charitable works. She was both praised and criticized for her pro-life views. She also received criticism for conditions in the hospices for which she was responsible. Her official biography was written by an Indian civil servant, Navin Chawla, and published in 1992.

 

DR. WAYNE DYER

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Dr. Wayne Dyer, the renowned motivational guru and author of dozens of self-help books, has died at age 75.

Dyer rose to prominence after the publication of his first book, 1976’s “Your Erroneous Zone,” became an international bestseller. That launched Dyer’s career as an author and speaker and garnered him a legion of ardent fans, who dubbed him the “father of motivation.”

His basic message was simple: Think good thoughts, and good things will surely follow.

“Take the last five minutes of your day, and put your attention on everything that you would like to attract into your life: ‘I am well. I am healed. I am in perfect health. I am abundant. I am happy.’ Say those things to yourself. Then you’ll marinate for eight hours, and you’ll awaken and you’ll begin to attract the things that are in your subconscious mind.”

Dyer’s own story is motivating in its own right: Born Michigan, he spent part of his childhood in orphanages and foster homes. He went on to earn a doctorate in educational counseling from Wayne State University and was teaching at St. John’s University in New York when the success of “Your Erroneous Zone” altered his professional course.

 

MELANIE BEATTIE

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Melody Beattie is one of America’s most beloved self-help authors and a household name in addiction and recovery circles. Her international bestselling book, Codependent No More, introduced the world to the term “codependency” in 1986. Millions of readers have trusted Melody’s words of wisdom and guidance because she knows firsthand what they’re going through. In her lifetime, she has survived abandonment, kidnapping, sexual abuse, drug and alcohol addiction, divorce, and the death of a child. “Beattie understands being overboard, which helps her throw bestselling lifelines to those still adrift,” said Time Magazine.

Melody was born in St. Paul, Minnesota in 1948. Her father left home when she was a toddler, and she was raised by her mother. She was abducted by a stranger at age four. Although she was rescued the same day, the incident set the tone for a childhood of abuse, and she was sexually abused by a neighbor throughout her youth. Her mother turned a blind eye, just as she had denied the occurrence of abuse in her own past.

“My mother was a classic codependent,” Melody recalls. “If she had a migraine, she wouldn’t take an aspirin because she didn’t do drugs. She believed in suffering.” Unlike her mother, Melody was determined to self-medicate her emotional pain. Beattie began drinking at age 12, was a full-blown alcoholic by age 13, and a junkie by 18, even as she graduated from high school with honors. She ran with a crowd called “The Minnesota Mafia” who robbed pharmacies to get drugs. After several arrests, a judge mandated that she had to “go to treatment for as long as it takes or go to jail.”

Melody continued to score drugs in treatment until a spiritual epiphany transformed her. “I was on the lawn smoking dope when the world turned this purplish color. Everything looked connected–like a Monet painting. It wasn’t a hallucination; it was what the Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous calls ‘a spiritual awakening.’ Until then, I’d felt entitled to use drugs. I finally realized that if I put half as much energy into doing the right thing as I had into doing wrong, I could do anything,” Beattie said.

After eight months of treatment, Melody left the hospital clean and sober, ready to take on new goals: helping others get sober, and getting married and having a family of her own. She married a former alcoholic who was also a prominent and respected counselor and had two children with him. Although she had stopped drinking and using drugs, she found herself sinking in despair. She discovered that her husband wasn’t sober; he’d been drinking and lying about it since before their marriage.

During her work with the spouses of addicts at a treatment center, she realized the problems that had led to her alcoholism were still there. Her pain wasn’t about her husband or his drinking; it was about her. There wasn’t a word for codependency yet. While Melody didn’t coin the term codependency, she became passionate about the subject. What was this thing we were doing to ourselves?

Driven into the ground financially by her husband’s alcoholism, Melody turned a life-long passion for writing into a career in journalism, writing about the issues that had consumed her for years. Her 24-year writing career has produced fifteen books published in twenty languages and hundreds of newspaper and magazine articles. She has been a frequent guest on many national television shows, including Oprah. She and her books continue to be featured regularly in national publications including Time, People, and most major periodicals around the world.

Although it almost destroyed her when her twelve-year-old son Shane died in a ski accident in 1991, eventually Melody picked up the pieces of her life again. “I wanted to die, but I kept waking up alive,” she says. She began skydiving, mountain-climbing, and teaching others what she’d learned about grief.

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Friends and Family – Friends and family have the ability to inspire you to be the best you can be. Friends are often able to step into the void when a supportive family doesn’t exist. You can count on friends and family to be there through good times and bad. They are there to pick you up when you fall, and ready to pat you on the back when you deserve it. Family accepts you for who you are while at the same time encouraging you to become all that you can be

Love – Love is an amazing thing! There is very little that will ignite a passion more than love. Love truly is a force to be reckoned with. Love never fails to motivate and inspire.

Nature – The peace and inspiration found by spending time with nature is like none other. The simplicity and beauty experienced as one communes with nature can be refreshing, invigorating and inspiring! Nature can be experienced almost anywhere, and can easily be incorporated into your everyday life. Nature can be as small as a potted plant on your desk or as large as the Amazon rain forest, and anything in between.

The Arts – Music, great writing, art and even acting all have the ability to touch the soul in a very unique and individual way. Art, in its many forms, moves and inspires you. The arts provide a means for you to escape to exotic, supernatural and exciting places, discovering new worlds and new things about yourself. The arts can challenge you to think and feel differently creating an environment where inspiration meets reality, often setting the stage for change.

Dreams – The dreams you have … the ones where you strive to create a better life for yourself and those around you frequently inspire you to reach beyond yourself. Your dreams motivate you to think differently in order change the status quo. We all have dreams … dreams to travel, to change lives, to build and create things. These dreams inspire us to grow in order to realize their fulfillment.

Forgiveness – Forgiveness is a gift … one you give to yourself even more than you give to the person who needs to be forgiven. Forgiveness releases you to move on with your life, not allowing the actions of another to hold you back. Lack of forgiveness can be a very destructive force. A true act of forgiveness inspires all who witness it and has the potential to transform the lives of all involved.

What Inspires You #GOFORIT

 

Author: melissaannsite

I'm a 40-something year old woman who has lived a life of adventure so far. I'm an ENFP Virgo with no judgment in my heart on others. Everyone is entitled to live their life as they wish, but I still enjoy the humor that life has to offer... and the memories.

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